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Humanizing the healthcare experience: the key to improved outcomes

Published:November 25, 2013DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2013.10.028
      This is an uncertain time to be in medicine. Most of us entered the profession to be of service to patients, to provide great clinical outcomes, and to be fairly compensated. Today, when asked whether physicians would recommend the medical profession to their children, most of them say no.

      A survey of America's physicians: practice patterns and perspectives. Survey conducted on behalf of The Physicians Foundation by Merritt Hawkins. Completed September 2012. Healthcarecomm.org [Internet]. Institute for Healthcare Communication. Accessed November 5, 2013.

      When pressed further, many point to an industry that is focused more on cost reduction, efficiency, and the adoption of health information technology that is dehumanizing medical care. When we add the increasing administrative and regulatory compliance burdens to the practice of medicine, you begin to understand the increase in physician burnout. The opportunity to change the dialogue is for physicians to play a leading role in designing innovations that improve the experience of care and restore joy to the practice of medicine.
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