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Wearable technology during GI endoscopic procedures with sedation

      Wearable technologies are smart electronic devices that can be incorporated into clothing or worn on the body.
      • Bower M.
      • Sturman D.
      What are the educational affordances of wearable technologies?.
      The most common examples are smart watches and fitness trackers, which record a person’s daily physical activity, including walking steps, running distance, and heart rate. However, as these devices evolve, newer wearable technology devices are capable of monitoring additional parameters, including heart rhythm with electrocardiogram monitoring, breathing patterns, skin temperature, and oxygen saturation.
      • Pevnick J.M.
      • Birkeland K.
      • Zimmer R.
      • et al.
      Wearable technology for cardiology: an update and framework for the future.
      Certain wearable technologies also have the capability of recording audio and video and providing real-time live broadcasts of these recordings. Thus, these devices pose a unique set of challenges when they are allowed into procedural sedation rooms.

      Abbreviations:

      FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration), HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act)
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